Winkelwagen
0 artikelen € 0,00

Home

Zoeken

E-boeken

Agenda

Nieuws

Over ons

Contact


Nieuwsbrief

Altijd op de hoogte van het laatste nieuws en nieuwe uitgaven!


Links


Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch female professionals in social work

Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch female professionals in social work
Titel: Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch female professionals in social work
The self-perception and positioning of young, newly-started professionals in social work
Auteur: Peter Hendriks
Bestelnr.: 9789463011679
Prijs : € 24,50
Status:Dit artikel is leverbaar.
Delen:
Plaats in winkelwagentje
Vorige

This qualitative research, carried out between 2012 and 2016 at the Utrecht University of Applied Sciences (HU) in the Netherlands, explores the experiences of newly-started Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch female professionals in social work. The key research question was how these professionals perceive and position themselves in relation to their profession.The professionals were actively involved as co-researchers in parts of the research, doing research with peers from the same background. The last section of the research also discusses and explores the experiences of social work educators by including their perspective.The Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch female professionals want to bring their cultural and religious background to bear on their work as professionals. They want to bring in faith and spirituality, as this is a source of strength and support for them, and attempt to stretch the 'boundaries' of what it means to be a professional. They would also like to see their organisations become 'less white' and see more of their own ethnic group in leading positions. Along with their expertise and strengths; they want recognition, equality and dignity as Muslims and as women. The professionals do not want to ignore their personal values in their work. For them the indistinctiveness of the social work profession, together with 'typically western' core values (such as emancipation and individualisation), presents a challenge to their goal of developing a 'professional identity'. They do not want to lose connection with their faith, tradition, and own community, and thereby losing strength.This book could be interesting for students, educators and professionals in social work and zooms in on the impact of increasing diversity on social work education and practice.Peter Hendriks is a lecturer and researcher at the Institute of Social Work at the Utrecht University of Applied Sciences (HU).